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I believe the quick strut includes the entire assembly with spring already together. These would let you swap out the entire unit whole.
Bare struts mean you have to compress the spring to separate the old strut and install the new strut.
I just replaced all my struts and shocks with the Bilstein 4600 series:
rear: Bilstein 24-139175
front: Bilstein 24-139168

I bought the set from shockwarehouse.com
Rockauto has them also, but after shipping the former cost less at the time.

The rears are super easy to do. The fronts a little more involved to access them, maneuver them in and out (if you have 4wd) and compress the springs, but all told it is still pretty straight forward.

Oddly enough, with the brand new fronts, now my front suspension squeaks. I think it may be because I cleaned but didn't lube the rubber isolators on either end of my springs. I may need to do that.
 

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I don't know about quality. I read a bunch of reviews on the forum that said the bilsteins were excellent so just went with them.

Doing the springs seemed scary at first--I read tons of horror stories about them. I was prepared to take them to a shop to have them swap out the strut/spring assembly for me, but a friend said he had the compressor tool and would do it for me--watching him it wasn't so bad--it's not like you have to compress it as far as it will go and load it up--just enough to free the mounting hardware. You might be able to rent the tool for free from autozone.

Honestly the springs wasn't the hardest part--pulling the battery tray and bracket under the TIPM was simple but not easy the first time just figuring it out. Then getting the clevis free and simply maneuvering it in and out took some effort.

Tip: you'll want to spread the top part of the clevis open a bit so it goes on the bottom of the strut easier. I just used a couple of pry bars.

If you're going to do suspension work you'll definitely want an impact wrench. Penetrating oil can help (wd-40 works great--better than pb-blaster--see Project Farm's tests). For loosening ball joints, the trick is to use a pry bar, find leverage, and push hard on it to bind it up so it stops spinning on you. An extra pair of hands is immensely helpful also.
 
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