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Nitro Addict!
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12Nm = 8.8 Ft Lbs. Where did you find the specs? Neither my hard copy or my PDF files have these for the 4.0.
I found the torque specs at the very end of the 4.0L engine section of the 2007 Nitro pdf service manual that I purchased on eBay a couple weeks ago. http://www.ebay.com/itm/DODGE-NITRO-2007-FACTORY-SERVICE-REPAIR-WORKSHOP-OEM-MAINTENANCE-FSM-MANUAL-/151579762609?vxp=mtr

It is not organized very well, and has no embedded links to take you from one part of the manual to another, but it is better than nothing.

My torque wrench is a half inch drive - max. 150ft/lb type, which is not really suited for any torque values less than 10ft/lbs, but I did set it at 8ft/lbs and check all the water pump bolts. Some of the bolts did not trigger the click on the torque wrench, but I did not feel comfortable turning them any further, as I did not want to snap a bolt, or strip the block threads and have to do a bolt thread repair and further delay the completion of getting my Nitro back on the road.

With the type of gasket that the water pump uses, I feel confident that all the bolts are tightened down enough to prevent any leaks. I had to quit working on it yesterday, due to back pain again, but hope to get the damper pulley re-installed today and the power steering "Stretch to Fit" belt installed, so I can then get the serpentine belt assembly mounted and the radiator put back in place. If I am real lucky, I might get close to finishing this repair job today. Just depends on how my back is feeling and how long I can push myself to try to finish.

Any of you younger guys & gals reading this, take good care of your backs and never lift more than you know you can comfortably handle. Once your back is damaged, it is almost impossible to fix it and you can't imagine how having constant back pain will change your life.
 

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Update on my (seeming) never ending project which started out with an (still) unexplained over heating incident over a week ago. I finally got everything reassembled and placed my new battery back into the Nitro and turned the key. I have to admit I was very concerned that something else was going to go wrong, specially after reading in other threads here about the warning to NOT remove the positive battery cable first (which of course I did).

Final tally of replaced parts are as follows:

Coolant Temperature Sensor
Thermostat (found that the first replacement one would not fit)
Water Pump
Timing Belt
Spark Plugs (just because I had to remove the intake to reach the Thermostat and Coolant Temp. Sensor, so figured I might as well replace the spark plugs while it was off, but could not afford to also replace the coil packs at this time)
Serpentine Belt (runs all accessories, except the Power Steering)
Power Steering "Stretch to Fit" belt
Crankshaft Damper Pulley (damaged mine while removing it and did not want to risk using it again, then having to tear down everything later to replace it if the serpentine belt broke due to the chipped pulley)
Battery

It took my Nitro about 15 minutes of driving for all of the warning lights on the dash to reset and go out, but all seems to be fine now and I had no problems during a 150 mile round trip down the mountain and back up yesterday. Since my old water pump & thermostat appeared to be in perfect working condition and since I was not low on coolant when the over heating occurred, I still don't know why it happened, or if it will happen again during my 700+ mile moving trip while towing a large trailer this weekend.

Wish me luck!
 

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Khaki Nitro Nut
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I found the torque info... It was way down there. Thanks for the info and LUCK on your trip. :smileup:
 

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Well, I have to delay my move another week, just too much stuff to do and pack, and not enough time (or energy in this old body) to get it all done and leave this Friday. I did not want to rush the completion of the trailer conversion and do a half-assed job of it, plus I would be sure to forget to pack something I really need in the first few weeks/months, before I come back to load a 2nd trailer full of stuff, so delaying the move another week makes the most sense.

This will also give me more time to test drive the Nitro to make sure my recent repairs and maintenance items are going to make the long trip without any troubles.

@Scar0, You must have the same PDF service manual, as it seems you found the torque specs in the same place, way down near the end of the file/manual.

Off Topic: Found the thread(s)
 

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So
As my Nitro begins to get up there in mileage and I just recently paid it off, I want to make sure that it lasts a good while longer. Therefore, I decided it was time to tackle the timing belt replacement on my ’08 4.0L. The timing belt is the one downfall to the 4.0L application but shouldn’t be a deterrent to anyone looking at a 4.0L.

I was quoted at around $600 for the timing belt, tensioner and water pump to be replaced. I was not about to throw this money at something I felt I could do myself.

Therefore, I decided to tackle this job myself. This was the first timing belt job my Father (who helped me) or myself had ever attempted. So there was a good bit of research done before we began this project. I suggest you do the same in addition to what I have written here. It pays off to know what you are working with.

I read all I could from other forums and the 2 shop manuals I have for the Nitro to make sure I could handle this job. I eventually decided it was time to take on the job.

The following is step by step of how we replaced the timing belt, water pump and tensioner. If you choose to do this repair yourself, I am in no way responsible if you mess something up. This is simply how we did the repair and it worked for us, I am by no means saying this is how one SHOULD do the repair. This is a challenging job that unless you have a good understanding of engines and the confidence in your repair sklills, probably should seek a professional to do the job.

Before I did anything, I made sure I had all the supplies I needed. Nothing worse than being in the middle of the job and needing to run to the store. The basic supplies needed for this job are as follows:

- New Timing Belt Kit (Should include water pump, timing belt, tensioner pulley and tensioner shock (optional) I used the Gates OEM kit
- At least 2 gallons of coolant (you should flush entire system)
- Pulley puller
- Belt dressing
- All necessary tools (screw driver, torx bits, pry bar, wrenches, sockets, hammer, jack and jack stands, etc…)
- White felt tip marker (important it can be seen on black surface)
- PATIENCE!

Before you begin, make sure you start the job in a location that you can leave the car for a day or so if necessary. Once you do, block the wheels so that it cannot move and make sure you leave the car in park or neutral. This will prevent any unintended movement of the engine from the wheels.
I then disconnected and completely removed the battery from the vehicle. This was to assure there was no chance of the battery terminals making contact with anything, plus it gives you room to work. The next step was to remove the air intake box and intake pipe attached to the intake manifold. Once again, this gives you more room plus it makes removing the intake manifold much easier.

After the air box and pipe are removed, the next step is to remove the washer fluid and coolant reservoir tank. The coolant line running from the radiator cap attaches to the back of the reservoir and needs to be removed. Then the washer fluid pump also needs to be removed from the side of the washer reservoir. There are 5 torx screws holding the reservoir in place. 3 of them are at the top of the reservoir attached to the top of the engine bay adjacent the grill. The other 2 screws are little trickier to get to. One is on the far Left end below the radiator cap and the other is on the extreme Right end below the washer fluid pump. When removing the reservoir, you may get a little wet from the fluid in the reservoir so try to remove as much as possible before taking it out of the engine bay.


Once the reservoir is removed, the intake manifold came next. See my previous thread on how to remove this “Thermostat Replacement“.

Along with the manifold, I also removed the plug coils and the spark plugs. I did this to remove compression in the engine if and when we had to rotate the crank to line up the crank and cam shafts. Not sure this was necessary but it made rotating the components much easier. Also, make sure you cover the top of the lower intake manifold once the top portion is removed to prevent anything from falling down into the engine.


The next item to remove is the radiator fan. This is simply held on by 2 bolts at the top sides. There is one screw holding 2 steel lines to the bottom of than fan as well that needs to be removed. Un-clip the electrical connector and the fan should pull straight out.

Once all of these items are removed, the real fun begins!
The next step is to remove the accessory drive belt from the front of the engine. This is done by inserting the square end of a socket wrench into the square on the tensioner and pushing it down.
This will relieve the tension on the belt and allow you to pull the belt off of the pulleys. I marked the belt showing which side was the front so that I could put it back on the same way I took it off. I did not replace this belt.


After the belt is removed, I then removed the tensioner assembly. There is one larger bolt that goes into the engine block and one smaller one that needs to be removed. The assembly should then come off. Next, you will need to remove the entire accessory pulley assembly from the front of the engine. There are a total of 4 bolts present going into the engine that must be removed. There is one bolt that has a nut and is also threaded itself into the engine must be removed
. Once these bolts are removed, there are 2 more bolts that must be removed in order to get the pulley assembly off of the engine entirely.

These 2 bolts are actually on the side of the engine by the A/C compressor. One is directly above the compressor and one is below it. Both of these need to be removed entirely in order to remove the pulley assembly. The bolt below the compressor is challenging to get to, so be patient and take your time.


Once all of these bolts are removed, you can then lift the entire pulley assembly out of the engine bay. You are now left with the following (see photo).

You then need to remove the power steering belt still on the pump and big pulley. This can be done by rotating the crank shaft pulley and using a screw driver to jump the belt off of the pump pulley. This is crude but is actually how the manual says to do it.

The next step was the hardest for us in the entire job, removing the dampener pulley. This pulley needs to be removed in order to take the timing belt cover off. To remove it, you will need a special pulley puller. The one we had, was a little large for this application.

The service manual shows a small jaw tool that actually grabs the pulley from the inside. Ours as is shown, attached to the outside. One mistake we made at this point was pulling on the middle ridge of the pulley. The pulley is actually comprised of 2 pulleys, pressed together. Pulling on the center ridge caused us to pull the 2 pulleys apart. This was ok as we still got the assembly off, but we had to press the pulleys back together when reassembling the engine.
the
 

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Khaki Nitro Nut
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Welcome to the forum Jeric duran.

When you have a chance, head over to the Newbie Section and say "Hi".
Tell us a little about yourself and your ride.
That way we can welcome you all proper like.

The serpentine belt and drive belt terms are sometimes interchangeable. This refers to the belt which drives the A/C, generator, and viscus fan (if you have a viscus fan). This thread is about changing the timing belt, which is internal and can not be seen without removing the cover and a bunch of other parts to get to it.
 

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This is a great how to! I've been going seamlessly well until this point. I had to pull the dampener pulleyes off in two pieces as that's the only way I could get a grip with the jaw that I had. But I noticed you said yours came apart as well. Do you have any tips on getting the two pulleys back together?
 

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THANK YOU, you saved me untold hours. I tackled this last weekend. I'll make a couple quick addendums. 1, don't be afraid to replace the timing belt tensioner cylinder. The original post mentions a coolant line in the way. If you go underneath, it's only held in place by a single 10mm bolt. You have plenty of clearance once it's loose. 2, The puller I rented from Advance worked like a charm. It was made by Powerbuilt. It has 3 fingers that grab the inside of the pulley, through the 3 oval holes. The trick was it doesn't attach with the puller together. I had to pull pins, and feed each finger through the holes individually, then line them back up and get the pins back in. That took some patience.

I will say the most frustrating part for me was the two side bolts on the accessory belt tensioner assembly. The ones that are above and below the AC compressor. That bottom one especially. There's no room to get anything other than a small wrench on it, giving it a 5th of a turn each time. The bolt is fine threaded and over an inch long.

All told I replaced the timing belt, water pump, timing belt tensioner and pulley (These all came in a kit together). Also the thermostat, spark plugs, PCV valve, air filter, and all coolant.

It's much smoother now, since I had 131000 miles on the original spark plugs. They were worn to nubs, but still didn't have misfires. Thanks again.
 

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Finished this how to. Great write up. Some remarks:

First of all, the pulley of the accessoire or multibelt , it's real though to get it of. Now it's explainable cause it is a tapered crankshaft without a wedge. So it has to be a tight fit. For the next ones , check , check , check. That you have enough clearance between bolt and pullet to pull it out. Be sure to have the center bolt act as real steady underground for the puller.

Tensioner: Indeed the space is tight but with the right wrench you can lose the bolts. Also with mounting the new belt, leave the tensioner loose at the bolts. Due to the fact that it isn't tensioned yet, the belt is already a tight fit. By already give the good tension on the belt from crank pulley to driver side camshaft, then to left camshaft you should be able to tension the room on the belt on the correct pulley where the pulley is on.

A/C pump bolts: We first took out the accessoire or multibelt pulley. Then there is enough room to get the whole panel out with only removing the nuts of these little sneaky .......

Waterpump: My waterpump had a plastic fan, and the new one i've got from moparonline was a steel one. Revision?

Powersteering belt: My new belt had a code ending on 0 , the old one was ending on 4. The difference between them was indeed 4 mm. Also maybe revised?

We didn't remove the spark plugs and air inlet header, wasn't really annoying also, just to let you know.

The removed coolant was refilled like advised by Nitrogen. Filled up the radiator to max, then we filled the reservoir to max. First some kneading in the coolant line, a drop of fluid was directly in the cooler, so filled her up again. Repeat, repeat, repeat. Then started up the vehicle, cooled down, filled up both again, repeat 2 times. The amount that came out , is refilled in the same amount.

Change list of mine: Waterpump , crankshaft belt , crankshaft belt tensioner with pulley. Accesoire belt with all pulleys and tensioner , and the power steering belt. Filled up with G12+ cooling liquid from Croon Oil

After all, great write up Meder24! Following step by step and some common sense it is a good doable job. Like you already remarked, get a good pulley puller for grabbing at the inside of the pulley. Dimensions are in my gallery.

Made photographs as addition to your main post, there in my gallery.
 

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Khaki Nitro Nut
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Glad to hear you got the job done timmytubby!
And thanks for the additional info and Pics!
 
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Mr. meder24, I wonder if you are still with us? I have a question
about your project. You say to mark the old/new timing belts.
I don’t understand why? If the belts are perfect circles, wouldn’t
the marks be the same 180° opposite? Thanks douglas
 

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Khaki Nitro Nut
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He transferred the location of timing marks on the 3 gears (1 on crank, and 1 each for the cams) onto the old belt.
He counted the teeth between the marks on the old belt, and made marks in the same location(count of teeth) on the new belt.

Then when you install the new belt, and have all the marks lined up with the gear marks, you are insured the timing is OK.
 

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I didn’t get it at first, now I apollo. BTW, is meder24 no
longer with us? He was an asset to this board. Thanks douglas
 

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Khaki Nitro Nut
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Haven't seen meder since 2016.
Agreed, he was a great contributor to the board.
 

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He must’ve gotten rid of his Nitro?
Thanks, douglas
 

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I started my exchange today and got into maybee some troubles, when putting on the belt one cam shaft pulley snapped away and I then rotated that camschaft clockwise so it once again aligned (more or less one turn). Did I mess upp the timing between left and right side and the crank shaft pulley?
 

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Khaki Nitro Nut
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I started my exchange today and got into maybee some troubles, when putting on the belt one cam shaft pulley snapped away and I then rotated that camschaft clockwise so it once again aligned (more or less one turn). Did I mess upp the timing between left and right side and the crank shaft pulley?
Most likely yes.
I do not know how far or which direction it rotated when it let loose. So I can't tell you how to correct it.
The problem is the 4.0 is a zero clearance engine. IE the valves will hit the pistons if not set correctly.
The SM says "DO NOT turn the camshafts a full revolution! Damage to the valves and pistons can occur!"

That being said, There are timing marks on the crank and both cams. Hopefully you aligned them before your started. If not, you have some work ahead.
 
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