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I hope this isn't considered "hijacking the thread" since it's a related issue.

I'm encouraged to see that the long crank issue may have been solved. My 2007 Nitro SLT intermittently had this issue over the last 10 years but would always eventually turn over. As of last night I won't turn over at all after a prolonged starter crank. The starter continues to engage for as long as 10 seconds until I turn the ignition off. I tried the TIP start feature but don't even hear the fuel pump humming at all. Recently, while idling in PARK, I heard the fuel pump humming for what seemed quite awhile until I finished my phone call and stopped the engine. It started right back up.

I live in L.A. and today wasn't cold by any standard. I'm wondering if its the fuel pump assembly since I don't hear the fuel pump humming when trying the tip starter? Hopefully something less expensive like a crank sensor or cam position sensor. Is it were my plugs, wouldn't there be some spluttering when I try to turn it over? Any help would be much appreciated.
 

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Update: After about 100 cranks since the sensor was changed, it happened again today. Engine was hot. Started 3 more times afterwards. Didn't happen again. But hey, if we've brought the occurrence of this down from any time the engine had run at all, down to 1/100 starts, I still consider it fixed. Must be a crappy sensor design or faulty build.
 

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The starter continues to engage for as long as 10 seconds until I turn the ignition off.
Before getting the cam position sensor changed last week, I've had mine crank so long that the auto-start simply disengaged, giving up on the start. It's always fired right up on a 2nd attempt though. No run-on. There have been cold mornings where I've used the remote start, and the damn thing would fail to start....EVEN WHILE COLD!

That all seems to be 99% in the past now.
 

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I hope this isn't considered "hijacking the thread" since it's a related issue.

I'm encouraged to see that the long crank issue may have been solved. My 2007 Nitro SLT intermittently had this issue over the last 10 years but would always eventually turn over. As of last night I won't turn over at all after a prolonged starter crank. The starter continues to engage for as long as 10 seconds until I turn the ignition off. I tried the TIP start feature but don't even hear the fuel pump humming at all. Recently, while idling in PARK, I heard the fuel pump humming for what seemed quite awhile until I finished my phone call and stopped the engine. It started right back up.

I live in L.A. and today wasn't cold by any standard. I'm wondering if its the fuel pump assembly since I don't hear the fuel pump humming when trying the tip starter? Hopefully something less expensive like a crank sensor or cam position sensor. Is it were my plugs, wouldn't there be some spluttering when I try to turn it over? Any help would be much appreciated.
Double, it sounds like your starter relay may be acting up. Check the tipm module under the hood. I can't remember which relay is the starter relay off the top of my head but there should be a diagram on the lid. If you are worried about the fuel pump, next time when you go to start the car, turn the key on but don't start it. You should hear the pump run for a few seconds to prime the system. If you don't it could be the fuel pump relay or even possibly the pump. I believe the relay for that is internal to the tipm. I have seen where there are troubleshooting cables for this online for around 13 dollars. Hopefully scar0 or nitrogen will chime in. I've read alot of their posts and they seem extremely knowledgeable about the inner workings of the nitro.
 

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Double, it sounds like your starter relay may be acting up. Check the tipm module under the hood. I can't remember which relay is the starter relay off the top of my head but there should be a diagram on the lid. If you are worried about the fuel pump, next time when you go to start the car, turn the key on but don't start it. You should hear the pump run for a few seconds to prime the system. If you don't it could be the fuel pump relay or even possibly the pump. I believe the relay for that is internal to the tipm. I have seen where there are troubleshooting cables for this online for around 13 dollars. Hopefully scar0 or nitrogen will chime in. I've read alot of their posts and they seem extremely knowledgeable about the inner workings of the nitro.
Thanks for the quick reply Joey. This has been a randomly occurring problem that now seems to have given up it's last gasp. By mechanical nature, if there is such a thing, it does seem to be more of a relay problem, now fully malfunctioning to it's final demise. Then again, I guess at nearly 200k miles and not having previously replaced any of the aforementioned parts it could be any one of them.

Now onto researching both the starter and fuel pump relay for cost and how to replace. Hopefully it's not the fuel pump assembly since I would rather not spend the $500-$600 plus time off the road.

Your assistance is greatly appreciated Joey Steinmetz!
 

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Thanks for the quick reply Joey. This has been a randomly occurring problem that now seems to have given up it's last gasp. By mechanical nature, if there is such a thing, it does seem to be more of a relay problem, now fully malfunctioning to it's final demise. Then again, I guess at nearly 200k miles and not having previously replaced any of the aforementioned parts it could be any one of them.

Now onto researching both the starter and fuel pump relay for cost and how to replace. Hopefully it's not the fuel pump assembly since I would rather not spend the $500-$600 plus time off the road.

Your assistance is greatly appreciated Joey Steinmetz!
It sounds like you've had a good run on not replacing parts. I would definitely start with the small stuff first. I haven't had mine nitro but a month or so but I'm ocd about stuff working correctly. I've already replaced the fuel pump, spark plugs, pcv valve, vapor canister, fuel tank, put new headlights with hids, upgraded all my interior lights to led etc. I just got the cam sensor swap done and it corrected my long crank time issue which originally I thought was the fuel pump. It only had 116k miles on it but I was having the tank replaced under the recall for the tank puking gas back out so I went ahead and had the new pump done at the same time. If you aren't cranking at all I'd really lean towards the starter relay. My little brother has fried 3 already on his old ford cranking it too long. It basically welds the contacts shut then burns up the coil inside. Once you get it cranking get the cam sensor changed out. It's super cheap and at a minimum it will eliminate it as a suspect. The other part of that system is the crank position sensor. The ecu checks both for proper rotation direction before allowing the engine to fire. That's why on mine it had the long crank issue because it took a few seconds to get a good signal to the ecu to tell it that it was turning the right way. After that you can look into the fuel pump relay and actual pump. If you can hear it run that's always good but if the pump wasn't pulling fuel correctly you would notice drivability issues like lack of power or sputtering. I just had to replace the pump in my silverado because at wot it was cutting in and out from lack of fuel. I would look at that last unless you had drivability problems prior to this. Hope this helps. This forum has been loads of help to me so far.
 

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It sounds like you've had a good run on not replacing parts. I would definitely start with the small stuff first. I haven't had mine nitro but a month or so but I'm ocd about stuff working correctly. I've already replaced the fuel pump, spark plugs, pcv valve, vapor canister, fuel tank, put new headlights with hids, upgraded all my interior lights to led etc. I just got the cam sensor swap done and it corrected my long crank time issue which originally I thought was the fuel pump. It only had 116k miles on it but I was having the tank replaced under the recall for the tank puking gas back out so I went ahead and had the new pump done at the same time. If you aren't cranking at all I'd really lean towards the starter relay. My little brother has fried 3 already on his old ford cranking it too long. It basically welds the contacts shut then burns up the coil inside. Once you get it cranking get the cam sensor changed out. It's super cheap and at a minimum it will eliminate it as a suspect. The other part of that system is the crank position sensor. The ecu checks both for proper rotation direction before allowing the engine to fire. That's why on mine it had the long crank issue because it took a few seconds to get a good signal to the ecu to tell it that it was turning the right way. After that you can look into the fuel pump relay and actual pump. If you can hear it run that's always good but if the pump wasn't pulling fuel correctly you would notice drivability issues like lack of power or sputtering. I just had to replace the pump in my silverado because at wot it was cutting in and out from lack of fuel. I would look at that last unless you had drivability problems prior to this. Hope this helps. This forum has been loads of help to me so far.
I'm looking in the TIPM module. The starter relay in question is the K4 RUN/START RLY, am I right, if you can confirm? Is there a low tech way to test if the relay switch is the problem such as use some metal like a paper clip to see it the car turns over?
Much obliged
 

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I'm looking in the TIPM module. The starter relay in question is the K4 RUN/START RLY, am I right, if you can confirm? Is there a low tech way to test if the relay switch is the problem such as use some metal like a paper clip to see it the car turns over?
Much obliged
I believe so. I'm about 500 miles from mine right now. My local auto parts store had them for $8. Pull it out and see if it smells like burnt plastic. You could always do some bench testing with a 12v battery. Find the pin diagram on the side of it and apply voltage across the coil to see if the relay closes. Then check for continuity across the contacts in the relay. You could also find one in the tipm that is the same and swap it in place to see if it will crank. I think there was an identical one next to that one in mine.
 

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I believe so. I'm about 500 miles from mine right now. My local auto parts store had them for $8. Pull it out and see if it smells like burnt plastic. You could always do some bench testing with a 12v battery. Find the pin diagram on the side of it and apply voltage across the coil to see if the relay closes. Then check for continuity across the contacts in the relay. You could also find one in the tipm that is the same and swap it in place to see if it will crank. I think there was an identical one next to that one in mine.
That's very helpful Joey, the dealer was unable to order it in less than a day but he was kind enough to call Autozone and confirm the corresponding aftermarket part so I'm picking it up on the way home from work and will post the result asap. Thanks again!
 

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That's very helpful Joey, the dealer was unable to order it in less than a day but he was kind enough to call Autozone and confirm the corresponding aftermarket part so I'm picking it up on the way home from work and will post the result asap. Thanks again!
Excellent. Hopefully that will get you going again. Happy to pass on any information I learn. As I said, this site has helped me out a ton already so the least I can do is help out anyone I can.
 

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Excellent. Hopefully that will get you going again. Happy to pass on any information I learn. As I said, this site has helped me out a ton already so the least I can do is help out anyone I can.
Unfortunately the starter relay did not solve the problem, still have a crank/no start condition. At first light I'm going to try replacing the crank sensor then the cam sensor since I bought both parts hoping one, the other, or both would prevent me from having to try the fuel pump module.

One things for sure, this exercise, having been my first in depth dive into DYI auto mechanics, has inspired and energized me to try and fix what I can, first aid style. Heck, I might get a pair of wheels ramps so I can work on the fuel pump module myself. The youtube demonstration seemed straight forward enough. I'm gonna have to get my room mate to take pictures of me under the hood or engine because that is a sight you don't see every day and no body will believe it unless they see it with their own two eyes. Cheers to that!
 

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Unfortunately the starter relay did not solve the problem, still have a crank/no start condition. At first light I'm going to try replacing the crank sensor then the cam sensor since I bought both parts hoping one, the other, or both would prevent me from having to try the fuel pump module.

One things for sure, this exercise, having been my first in depth dive into DYI auto mechanics, has inspired and energized me to try and fix what I can, first aid style. Heck, I might get a pair of wheels ramps so I can work on the fuel pump module myself. The youtube demonstration seemed straight forward enough. I'm gonna have to get my room mate to take pictures of me under the hood or engine because that is a sight you don't see every day and no body will believe it unless they see it with their own two eyes. Cheers to that!
Dang. That stinks. Sorry to hear. Have you tried turning on the key without starting to see if you can hear the pump prime? There is a video I saw on YouTube that there was a guy that made a cable to troubleshoot the fuel pump relay inside the tipm. It basically bypassed the fuel pump relay to check if that was the issue. If you don't hear the pump prime you could start there.
 

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Dang. That stinks. Sorry to hear. Have you tried turning on the key without starting to see if you can hear the pump prime? There is a video I saw on YouTube that there was a guy that made a cable to troubleshoot the fuel pump relay inside the tipm. It basically bypassed the fuel pump relay to check if that was the issue. If you don't hear the pump prime you could start there.
Yes, I mentioned on my first post that I didn't hear the feul pump when turning to the in position. I may have seen that video and remembering that I didn't have the same tools he used for the bypass. If I can't verify with a trouble shoot I may just but the dang part.
 

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Yes, I mentioned on my first post that I didn't hear the feul pump when turning to the in position. I may have seen that video and remembering that I didn't have the same tools he used for the bypass. If I can't verify with a trouble shoot I may just but the dang part.
Here is a video on troubleshooting the relay and the pump. Double check on your tipm lid that it's the same fuses he is looking at compared to yours and you could do this with a piece of insulated wire. Just be extra careful and make sure not to short anything. If you don't feel comfortable doing it that way those cables are available as well.
 

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Here is a video on troubleshooting the relay and the pump. Double check on your tipm lid that it's the same fuses he is looking at compared to yours and you could do this with a piece of insulated wire. Just be extra careful and make sure not to short anything. If you don't feel comfortable doing it that way those cables are available as well.
Interesting! I didn't see this video, thank you Joey. From what he describes it may well be a faulty relay. Looks like I'm buying a new relay this morning too since I have not started working on the sensor replacement.
 
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