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Are there any telltale signs that the timing belt has been replaced? What I am asking is with 114K miles I would just replace it but this 4.0 is a beast to work on and from what I see the timing belt/water pump is a big job. Is there any way to know if it has been done visually without tearing it down only to find out this has been done? I understand the need for this replacement but I have the college of hard knocks experience of pulling radiators etc only to find it has been done. I see that they say it will need to be inspected but a replacement will always be necessary at this millage or earlier. Can't see putting 100K miles on a rubber band without replacing it.

Anything I can look for?

;)
 

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Khaki Nitro Nut
07Lifted,4X4,6sp-man,3.7L
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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the reply ScareO

I am going to try something a little different based on the above how to link. Since the indent at the end of the crank where the point of the puller will seat is a machined surface and most pullers are somewhat machined I am going to look for "spin score marks" as the tightening of the puller to remove the pully would leave marks in the very precisely chamfered crank indent. If it shows any wear then it would have been removed. I think I will start there.
 

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if the belt is old it will normaly be very shiny on the smooth side where it has run around the pulleys for 10 years, plus if a new one was fitted normaly you would see some alignment markers from the mechanic and maybe the part n° etc printed on the belt.
 
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Khaki Nitro Nut
07Lifted,4X4,6sp-man,3.7L
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if the belt is old it will normaly be very shiny on the smooth side where it has run around the pulleys for 10 years, plus if a new one was fitted normaly you would see some alignment markers from the mechanic and maybe the part n° etc printed on the belt.
The problem with this is, to see the timing belt you have to basically remove everything. It would be a lot of work for not if it has already been done.
 
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i never said it would be easy :).
 
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I'm very interested in what you discover ElectricBlueRT. (God I wish I could've found a blue RT ! Mine's red, '09. Nice but not as nice.) 120k when I bought it. Sounds like you've got a couple of good "Sherlock-type" ideas workin' there. Thanks for sharing what you find . . .
 

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I just had my Timing Belt and Water Pump replaced at 100400 miles... Also had them replace the Heater Core... All for $1,100 - I Know What A deal... Chrysler wanted 2-2.5k Just for the Heater Core...

Anyway, what the deal with checking / verifying that the Timing is right (spot on)?

BTW: Lovin' my '11 Shock...
 

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Khaki Nitro Nut
07Lifted,4X4,6sp-man,3.7L
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Its a Zero clearance engine. Plus it needs to run right.
Thanks Scar0, I guess I should have stated that as a question...
How can I check / verify that the Timing is right / correct / spot on? I do have a Timing Light?
And what should the timing be ## BTDC?
I have yet to drive it on any trips more than 16 miles round trip, and I leave it idling (while on an emergency scene), So, It's only about 13 MPG now... The best I've ever gotten was 21 MPG on a long straight trip (TN to KS) with Cruise Control set to about 75...
 

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Thanks Scar0, I guess I should have stated that as a question...
How can I check / verify that the Timing is right / correct / spot on? I do have a Timing Light?
And what should the timing be ## BTDC?
I have yet to drive it on any trips more than 16 miles round trip, and I leave it idling (while on an emergency scene), So, It's only about 13 MPG now... The best I've ever gotten was 21 MPG on a long straight trip (TN to KS) with Cruise Control set to about 75...
This is an interesting image of the Timing Belt...
39091
 

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Khaki Nitro Nut
07Lifted,4X4,6sp-man,3.7L
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Ignition timing in the Nitro is controlled by the computers and sensors. Not adjustable like old school. 😢

What the timing belt does is to keep the position of the 2 cams (and therefor the valves) set "in time" with the crank/pistons position.
When installing a timing belt(or chain as the case may be), it is VERY important the timing marks of the gears of all 3 line up with the correct "set" marks. If they are set wrong, then the valves will open at the wrong "time". Not a good thing with any engine, but especially bad in a zero clearance engine. A zero clearance (AKA interference) engine's pistons will hit the valves if the valves are open at the wrong time on either/both the compression or exhaust stroke. Thus the term zero clearance/interference.

BTW I also have a timing light, and to really date myself, I have a dwell meter too...
 
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But, is there a way to "Check The Timing" without tearing it apart to verify that's it's precise?
Like the old days when we would loosen the distributor cap and rotate the distributor till it hit the specified BTDC (Ex: 327 CU S/B about 35 BTDC)?
My Shock runs fine... Just curious as I used to do my own tuneups, Back In The Day, and world adjust as precisely as possible and would like to verify the timing on it...
 

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Khaki Nitro Nut
07Lifted,4X4,6sp-man,3.7L
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Short answer, no.
The timing belt has nada to to with the ignition timing (so to speak*↓). IE rotating the distributor cap to set spark to happen at x # ° BTDC.
It would be nice to be able adjust the ignition timing like we used to, but not with the new rigs. Computers have taken that over.

Checking Timing Belt:
Not unless you break the front of the engine down to see the timing belt. It should not be an issue if you follow the 100K mile timing belt replacement(4.0L only) in the owners manual.
Once set, it will not change unless it slips a notch, or breaks. Then you will know it...
The belt will stretch a little over time, but that is what the tensioner is there for (takes up the slack.).

* The timing belt syncs the Cams to the Crank, the Cam and Crank sensors send signals to the PCM as to the location of those 2. The computer uses that info along with other sensor inputs such as throttle pedal position, speed, MAP and IAT, +, +, +, to determine injection "time", pulse width (quantity) of fuel. It also uses this info to set and execute ignition "time" IE spark.(x # ° BTDC)
 
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Thanks Again Scar0, I did have the Timing Belt, and Water Pump, replaced at 100400 miles about a month ago. I kept the TB just for grins... It's still in good condition.

I learned the hard way to replace it as directed. That lesson was learned when the TB broke on my '84 Honda Civic @ about 70k miles. The recommended that it should be changed at 65k. I wish they said IT BETTER BE CHANGED AT OR BEFORE 65K OR YOU'LL KILL THE ENGINE... which I did... It was never the same after that.

So, anyone thinking if they should change it... I say Do It!...
 

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most people don't think about the service schedule in months, it is 100k miles or 102 months (8.5 years) for the 4.0l timing belt.
 
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HAHAHAHA....a Dwell Meter ! I haven't even HEARD that term in so long.


Ignition timing in the Nitro is controlled by the computers and sensors. Not adjustable like old school. 😢

What the timing belt does is to keep the position of the 2 cams (and therefor the valves) set "in time" with the crank/pistons position.
When installing a timing belt(or chain as the case may be), it is VERY important the timing marks of the gears of all 3 line up with the correct "set" marks. If they are set wrong, then the valves will open at the wrong "time". Not a good thing with any engine, but especially bad in a zero clearance engine. A zero clearance (AKA interference) engine's pistons will hit the valves if the valves are open at the wrong time on either/both the compression or exhaust stroke. Thus the term zero clearance/interference.

BTW I also have a timing light, and to really date myself, I have a dwell meter too...
 
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